Fashion Store – Mijas Guide http://mijasguide.com/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 21:45:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://mijasguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/mijas-guide-icon-150x150.png Fashion Store – Mijas Guide http://mijasguide.com/ 32 32 Haute couture on display at Edmonds Senior Center Thrift Store https://mijasguide.com/haute-couture-on-display-at-edmonds-senior-center-thrift-store/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 21:45:28 +0000 https://mijasguide.com/haute-couture-on-display-at-edmonds-senior-center-thrift-store/
With cooler weather on the way, this model shows off her plaid tunic, perfectly coordinated with black pants, boots and a designer shawl. The set was priced under $60.

Edmonds residents have always known that some of the best thrift stores are at the Edmonds Senior Center Thrift Store. What better way to showcase the store’s offerings than at a fashion show on Saturday, with proceeds benefiting Edmonds Waterfront Centre’s Seniors’ Lunch Program for those struggling with food insecurity.

The show featured 12 role models made up of Waterfront Center board members, staff and volunteers. They scoured the shelves of thrift stores to assemble a range of striking ensembles, from casual to formal, fun to fabulous, bewitching to breathtaking.

A crowd of fashion-savvy (and budget-conscious) attendees gathered in the Waterfront Center’s upstairs function room, all ready to see how to create an eye-catching look without breaking the bank.

And they weren’t disappointed.

How about a long dress with matching leopard print hat, shoes and shawl. Yours for less than $50.
When they want to hide from the spotlight, all former mayors need a complete disguise with gloves, hat and sunglasses. This look modeled by Gary Haakenson was under $60.

With comments from Mary Lewis, attendees saw a number of sets – many with designer labels, some even brand new with original labels. Each outfit featured coordinating shoes, jewelry, clutches and accessories to complete the look.

Along with describing each set, Lewis added pricing information, highlighting how the Edmonds Senior Center Thrift Store can make you look great for a night out on the town while still leaving enough spare change in your pocket for dinner and a show. .

This matching costume with a red hat and purse says “I go places.” And costs less than $60.
Looking like Annie Hall in uptown, this model completes the look with a newsboy-style puffy cap.
The hat says it all – straight from the streets of New York, to the $10 animal print platform boots.
This model sports a classic retro bad-boy look with the black leather jacket, vest, white t-shirt, boots and sunglasses. His Harley was parked just outside.
This model’s stunning lace dress perfectly complements her partner’s retro tuxedo.

After the show, all the clothes and accessories were offered for sale, and there was a rush at tables and hanging racks as attendees rushed to grab their favourites.

This was only the second Edmonds Senior Center Thrift Store fashion show. The first came after the store moved to its Westgate location from the old Edmonds Senior Center, which was demolished to build the new intergenerational Waterfront Center. Based on Saturday’s response, it won’t be the last.

After the show, attendees look at the clothes worn by the models in the show.
Attendees gathered around the accessories table to check out jewelry and other essentials.
Check out these eye-catching red boots.

The thrift store is open Monday to Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (closed on Sunday). It is located next to Westgate QFC at 22820 100th Ave. W. and offers daily specials where the already low prices are further reduced. For more details, see the website here.

— Story and photos by Larry Vogel

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Mara Hoffman brings fiber enthusiasts together in industry’s first in-store discussion – WWD https://mijasguide.com/mara-hoffman-brings-fiber-enthusiasts-together-in-industrys-first-in-store-discussion-wwd/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 20:22:56 +0000 https://mijasguide.com/mara-hoffman-brings-fiber-enthusiasts-together-in-industrys-first-in-store-discussion-wwd/

Mara Hoffman summoned fiber and climate enthusiasts for a light but spirited conversation at her Lafayette Street store.

It was the first time the contemporary designer hosted an industry conversation at her incense-scented, plant-filled showcase, which opened last year, as previous gatherings took a more intimate turn. for artists’ discussions by the fireside. The Climate Neutral certified brand has been a dedicated and vocal advocate in the sustainability community for several years, when Hoffman decided to pivot his company’s mission.

Dana Davis, Vice President of Sustainability at Mara Hoffman, moderated the session billed as a “Climate Friendly” panel that included Chantelle Davis, a new designer and founder of the Boe Davis label; Liz Alessi, a Brand Coach and Sustainability Consultant; Stacie Chavez, President of Imperial Yarn; and Laura Sansone, designer of the New York Textile Lab.

For many panelists, the chat was an opportunity to reflect on their careers and progress on sustainability. “For the first time in my entire career in fashion, I can say that I feel good about my job,” said Alessi, describing how easy it is to float ideas of sustainability – including the use of materials such as seaweed leather – straight to the top now. that she is something of an external sustainability consultant and is no longer part of Coach’s procurement department. In her case, she speaks directly to Coach’s creative director, Stuart Vevers. (Although the seaweed material is yet to be announced in Coach bags, it’s a preview of things to come, especially as Vevers puts circularity more at the center of the American brand).

While Coach isn’t perfect, the Tapestry-owned brand has pledged to source 90% of its leather from gold and silver rated leather tanneries by 2025, as well as continue leather regeneration.

Chantelle Davis, who founded the Boe Davis label, is also driven by a similar motivation. “I wanted to stop being so disinterested in clothes,” she said. “Polyester blended into everything has never really been to our benefit.” It is attached to natural fibers and domestic manufacturing.

During the discussion, New York Textile Lab founder Laura Sansone intended to communicate the importance of bioregional ecosystems, or fiber shed systems occurring within a 300-mile radius, which present limitations. and unique growth abilities.

For her, fibers present a “logic of growth” that allows new ideas to seep through and create value in the end product for the end user. But consumers need to know the special story behind it all. An example? “Tick leather,” as she noted, sounds questionable, but is actually the result of minor imperfections in skins (or farm life) affected by ticks. “Doesn’t that make it nuanced and special?” Doesn’t that connect him to the earth? asked Sansone.

But being special comes with a price shock, for now, until the system supports new projects such as “C4”, a cotton sourcing initiative from Reformation, Fibershed and more, that Stacie Chavez, President of Imperial Yarn and Partner of Fibershed mentioned. as she talked about why climate-beneficial products pay more in industry livelihoods.

For more than five years, climate-beneficial wool has been verified in the United States by Fibershed and sourced from land stewards who enhance carbon reduction through farming practices that replenish soil health. Mara Hoffman, for her part, uses wool for her knitwear.

“Are we more expensive? We are, but we pay our breeders more,” Chavez said. “Our breeders earn a premium for maintaining these carbon production plants. We are doing good work. The greatest compliment I have ever received is [when] one of my breeders called me and said, “You know, wool is on our financial statements now.” It has an impact. We actually made money on our yarn this year.

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Lee and Wrangler launch new joint denim store concept in Berlin https://mijasguide.com/lee-and-wrangler-launch-new-joint-denim-store-concept-in-berlin/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 07:13:17 +0000 https://mijasguide.com/lee-and-wrangler-launch-new-joint-denim-store-concept-in-berlin/

FASHION

Kontoor Brands will launch a new dual-brand denim store for Lee and Wrangler as part of a new retail concept that will aim to provide customers with “the ultimate denim experience”.

The first store will open in Berlin and will be followed by other openings in several European cities.

Chris Waldeck, Lee’s Co-COO and President of Global Brand, said, “Europe continues to be a key market for the expansion of the Lee and Wrangler brands. The new Lee and Wrangler dual-brand stores will create a powerful platform for our iconic denim brands to excite and engage our growing European consumer base.

“In the coming months, you can expect to see new Lee and Wrangler stores in key retail destinations across Europe, as we continue to showcase our brands’ iconic designs and unrivaled heritage. denim to new audiences.”

The new stores will offer consumers an immersive experience and will feature a double facade with separate storefronts and facades for each brand.

At the Berlin store, consumers will find jeans from both brands marketed by gender and fit in the main store area, as well as a range of clothing options. There will also be a denim specialty room housing a wider variety of denim on a stack of seven shelves.

The Berlin store will be located on Tauntzienstrasse, a major shopping street in the City West district.

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Discover the Melbourne vintage store that champions upcycling https://mijasguide.com/discover-the-melbourne-vintage-store-that-champions-upcycling/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 06:43:55 +0000 https://mijasguide.com/discover-the-melbourne-vintage-store-that-champions-upcycling/

I just think we need to encourage customers to think of new ways to use parts.

The trend cycle in 2022 is moving at breakneck speed. Fashion influencers on apps like TikTok have the divine ability to spark a micro trend – think leggings, pearl necklaces and sweater vests – and fast fashion brands are churning out masses of poorly made items. to respond to a population eager to keep pace. So what is the antidote to this culture of overconsumption and disposable purchases?

Vault, a vintage store in Melbourne, believes vintage fashion and upcycling can provide us with a way to tap into the trend cycle without buying new items. The not-for-profit vintage store, located in Melbourne’s iconic Block Arcade, is a new venture for the National Trust of Victoria. Opened in November 2021, proceeds from the store go towards the preservation of historic properties, including the Rippon Lea Mansion, Como House and the Old Melbourne Jail.


For more fashion news, shoots, articles and reports, visit our Fashion section.


After decades of volunteer-run vintage markets, the permanent showcase is a way to raise funds and engage a younger market in the work carried out by the National Trust. And since Generation Z and Generation Y are particularly fond of second-hand fashion, Vault’s upcycled fashion show as part of Melbourne Fashion Week (M/FW) will serve as a timely introduction to anyone who has yet to visit the store.

As the official media partner of M/FW – and a longtime proponent of a slower, more considered approach to fashion – fashion magazine is particularly impressed with Vault’s approach to vintage fashion. While some would say that preserving the integrity of a vintage piece is of the utmost importance, Vault wants to encourage people to take ownership of an item by modifying and recycling it. An 80s prom dress that looks too fancy for you to wear? No worries, turn it into a ruffled tulle midi skirt.

It’s this approach, which Vault calls its Upcycle Initiative, that sees the store inviting a team of local designers, including Sorrento, Chelsea Hickmanand moose dollto breathe new life into old clothes for his M/FW debut. We caught up with Vault Director Jack Fordham to discuss the environmental impact of fashion, how you can keep up with the trend cycle without buying again, and what we can expect from the next show.

Can you tell me a bit about the Vault philosophy?

I think something we want to champion is that buying used clothing is the most sustainable thing you can do in fashion. We definitely encourage our customers to take pieces – and it doesn’t matter if it’s a designer piece or a rare piece – if they like it, and they think it would be better without sleeves , or if they want to change the color of this one, or if they want to make a top out of a skirt, it’s like, go ahead. As long as they reuse, I think that’s a good thing.

It’s really interesting to hear you say, especially with designer pieces, because I know some people are keen on preserving them.

I think there is room for that too. We have a beautiful 1969 Pierre Balmain dress in the shop and I wouldn’t recommend taking it apart. But look, it’s up to the owner – if he wants to change it, he should. I just think we need to encourage customers to think of new ways to use parts.

What are some of the benefits of buying vintage fashion?

The fashion industry I know overproduces 30-40% of products, contributes 10% of all global carbon emissions, and is the second worst in the world for water and plastic pollution. Buying second-hand does nothing. There really is no lag.

You prevent something from becoming waste and you also prevent yourself from buying something new.

Everything is very cyclical. Even the things that we thought, ‘Oh, that’s so old fashioned, who could wear that now?’, are all coming back into fashion. As a fashion-loving individual, I have pieces in my wardrobe that I’ve had since I was 14. I still wear them and they still fit because my mom liked to buy oversized. I just think it all comes together, and why not swap out some of your pieces for new vintage pieces and redo an entire outfit?

How can shoppers use second-hand clothes to their advantage when trying to shop for current trends?

They can mix and match in the store which is great. Or we can give them a shirt from the store to see how they might wear it at home, so they can look at what they have in their own wardrobe. It also goes into the details. We sell a lot of costume jewelry, and sometimes just adding a brooch or necklace can also update the outfit.

Pieces that still exist today must have good quality fabric and craftsmanship if they have lasted this long.

Within Vault we have a lot of designers from Australia and even Melbourne who are no longer there. It just shows you the quality that was made at the time, that they are 50 years old but still look in great condition. For example, at the bottom of the runway, we put a wedding dress from 1989.

We didn’t do anything to the dress, we just styled [it] with a contemporary hairstyle and makeup, and that changed everything. Some pieces may look dated on a hanger, but as soon as you put them on a moving body, they really change. It is also about the confidence of the wearer to bring this piece to life.

It looks like the trend cycle is accelerating. Do you think that’s really good for vintage because it means styles quickly come back into fashion?

My personal belief is that it’s too fast. Companies like Shein and even ASOS, like what do they really produce? It’s nothing of quality. But I see a lot of people, just through Instagram and TikTok and other social media platforms, they’re going to buy a cute vintage dress or a two-piece from Vault, and then they’re going to match that with, like, a new pair of Prada shoes .

It’s about putting the money on a quality piece but matching it to something that costs around $20. That’s not to say there aren’t issues with luxury also being a contributor to fast fashion, but I see it often, the way people mix up and down.

What was the inspiration behind the M/FW upcycling track project?

The Block Arcade is a beautiful old building. Seeing fresh new designers in there is something that doesn’t happen very often. But in the 80s, they were doing parades through the Block Arcade. Even long before that, there was a thing called “doing the block”, where ladies and gentlemen strolled around the Block Arcade and Collins Street and window-shopped. We’re sort of bringing that tradition back. Part of the reason for doing these tracks [was] the amount of stuff I had in Vault.

Lots of things are great, but there are a few pieces that are so dated. [We had] this great marshmallow 1980s wedding dress and while I believe my statement that anyone can wear anything, it wouldn’t sell. We gave it to a designer called Oscar Keen who did it again in this amazing piece. It was about giving away pieces that might have a hole, or might be stained, or moth holes are a very common thing in vintage clothing, and just taking the pieces that are too worn out and reusing them.

Upcycling has really taken off during the pandemic, with established designers getting involved due to manufacturing difficulties. Do you think he’s here to stay?

I really do. With the way things are going, I think that will continue. My only rule with the upcoming track was that the designers had to use deadstock or offcuts, and there was no space (other than maybe a zipper) to buy anything for the product. Everything was simply reused from their own workshop or from Vault.

It’s always amazing what people can do. Sometimes limitations are also good for creativity.

Absolutely. I hope this is the start of an annual event for us, that we can champion sustainable fashion here at Fashion Week and make it a bigger and better event. This is only our first year, but I hope there will be many more to come.

You can attend the Vault Runway on October 14 during Melbourne Fashion Week 2022. Read more here.

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Big brands face a dilemma on whether to continue selling their products in Russia https://mijasguide.com/big-brands-face-a-dilemma-on-whether-to-continue-selling-their-products-in-russia/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 13:36:22 +0000 https://mijasguide.com/big-brands-face-a-dilemma-on-whether-to-continue-selling-their-products-in-russia/

The Scene is a high-end fashion store in Florence. A cheerful middle-aged Russian couple have finished choosing their clothes and are ready to pay. The man pulls out a roll of freshly minted €100 notes and begins peeling them off one by one on the counter. Russians, even those with bank accounts abroad, cannot pay by card due to sanctions imposed by Britain, the EU and the United States in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine.

‘How many of them can we accept?’ shouts the assistant as the crisp green notes pile up in front of her. Italy limits the amount of cash used to pay for a single transaction ‒ a cap imposed to combat tax evasion.

The manager appears and a solution is found. The man and woman split their purchases to stay within the €2,000 limit and left smiling with two bags stuffed full of elegant designer clothes.

An EU ordinance prohibits the export to Russia of luxury goods – anything on a long list of nearly 50 types of clothing with a price tag of more than €300. Illustration: Marcos Farina

These are tough times for the fashion industry. And nowhere more than in Italy where large swaths of the population depend on design for their livelihood.

An industry normally focused on turning taste into revenue has suddenly found itself grappling with Article 3h of European Council Regulation 833/2014 (an amendment of 428/2022). This is the EU ordinance that prohibits the export to Russia of luxury goods – anything on a long list of nearly 50 types of clothing with a price tag of over €300.

For most continental fashion houses, the sanction represents a ban on all shipments to Russia. But companies that make cheaper parts can continue to export without breaking regulations. Whether they are morally right to do so is another matter.

A department at Yale University in the United States has been diligently monitoring the corporate response to the invasion of Ukraine. Companies have a legal obligation to comply with the sanctions, but due to the way the regulations have been developed, some companies are not required to comply. Others who follow the sanctions to the letter may nevertheless find that their goods still end up on sale in Russia, having been diverted from a third country to which they were legally exported.

Benetton has decided to continue its business activities in Russia

Opponents of Vladimir Putin’s war who have fled abroad say their friends in Russia can still buy many luxury items that were available before the invasion through Russian online retailers. “The only difference is that they have to wait seven days for the clothes or shoes to be delivered,” said a dissident who asked not to be named for fear of reprisal.

Yale’s team of 29 researchers ranks companies from A (“companies ceasing Russian engagements or leaving Russia altogether”) to F (“companies continuing business as usual in Russia”).

Many luxury Italian brands – Moncler, Salvatore Ferragamo, Prada and Zegna – are rated B, the rating given to “companies temporarily reducing almost all operations while keeping return options open”. Many French and German competitors are in the same category.

A senior executive at one of Italy’s major fashion houses said that since the luxury goods embargo came into force in March, “we haven’t shipped a single tie to Russia.”

In the short term, the ban will cost his businesses and similar businesses surprisingly little. The figures give the impression that Italian couturiers do not count on selling to the family of Russian oligarchs. Valentino revealed earlier this year that sales in Russia account for just three percent of its revenue. But that omits all the beautiful dresses, shoes and bags bought by Russian tourists abroad, whether in Rome, Portofino or in boutiques elsewhere such as London, Paris and New York. All these sales remain perfectly legal, as demonstrated by the Russian couple from Florence.

In the longer term, however, there may be a price to pay. Fashion houses risk being sued in Russian courts. Most do not own the stores where their wares are sold. They are operated by local franchisees with whom they have contracts. And, in many cases, the brands do not respect these contracts because they do not supply their Russian partners with goods, in particular those under €300 not subject to the embargo.

“This is an area where companies struggle to reconcile their legal obligations with the right thing to do,” says Tom Cummins, a partner at Ashurst, a London law firm that advises companies on sanctions. Added to the legal risks of cutting off supplies to Russia are the reputational dangers of exporting items that are not covered by the sanctions.

“Consumers may very well say, ‘I don’t want to buy your products anymore because you continue to profit from business in Russia,'” Cummins says. “Young people are particularly sensitive to ethical issues.

In fashion, the further down one goes into the market where products cost less than €300 and where young consumers are in the majority, the more delicate the balance becomes.

Yoox, the Milan-based global online retail giant, is an example of a company that could have continued working with Russia but decided not to. Its website offers many products under 300 €. But a few days after the invasion, it suspended all its activities in Russia, posting a message in Russian on its website which read: “Due to the current situation, we are unable to process new orders in your country. country”.

According to Yale, however, four of the best-known names in Italian fashion have taken a different approach. Armani, Benetton, Diesel and Calzedonia have all been relegated to the “trash can” with the lowest possible rating, accused of pretending nothing has happened.

The most surprising is Armani, since it hardly belongs to the bargain price segment, even if its Emporio Armani stores appeal to a young clientele. When asked to comment, the Armani Group released a statement saying it “does not operate directly in Russia and stores operating in the country with the group’s brands are run by independent franchisees.” He added that Armani “adheres in strict compliance with the sanctions regime issued by the EU”.

A spokesperson said the group had suspended online sales, but did not answer when asked whether it exported products under 300 euros to stores operating under its brand.

Diesel said it shut down its online business. She stressed that she did not have her own stores in Russia and that she respected the sanctions while specifying that they did not apply to products sold for less than 300 euros.

Calzedonia simply refused to discuss the matter. As for Benetton, a company that for decades has linked its products to the notions of diversity and racial equality, its website states: “Social responsibility is intrinsic to the Benetton group and has always been expressed through a way of “doing business” based on principles of respect for the environment and people ‒ at all levels ‒ and on campaigns for the defense of human rights.

True to these fine principles, following the invasion, “Benetton Group immediately expressed its deepest concern over the dramatic ongoing humanitarian crisis,” according to a statement provided to YOU. “In this context, the company has decided to suspend all its development business plans in Russia, affecting its business investments in favor of humanitarian aid to the Ukrainian people supported by the Italian Red Cross.”

The Italian conglomerate has “also donated clothing to Ukrainian refugees and provides protection and support to Ukrainian refugees in Italy,” the statement said. But donating clothes and money is one thing, and under the current circumstances suspending future investments might even be seen as a smart business move. But what about stopping business in Russia to argue that invading another sovereign nation does not correspond to respect for people “at all levels”, let alone “defend the rights of the human being”. ‘man ” ?

No dice. “Benetton Group,” the statement continued, “has decided to continue its commercial activities in Russia, based on long-standing relationships with commercial and logistics partners and on a network of stores employing more than 600 families.”

For some fashion houses, expressing their solidarity with Ukraine does not mean stopping business operations in Russia. But whether customers understand this and whether it will influence their choices as consumers remains to be seen.

  • John Hooper is Italy correspondent for The Economist
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14 Latin Style Brands to Buy Across Texas https://mijasguide.com/14-latin-style-brands-to-buy-across-texas/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 22:00:02 +0000 https://mijasguide.com/14-latin-style-brands-to-buy-across-texas/

JThe culture of exas owes an undeniable debt of gratitude to our Hispanic, Chicano, Tejano and Latino communities. And while the influence is long-standing, a variety of young Latina-owned brands are now offering a modern twist on a cherished tradition or making waves for meaningful missions.

JThe culture of exas owes an undeniable debt of gratitude to our Hispanic, Chicano, Tejano and Latino communities. And while the influence is long-standing, a variety of young Latina-owned brands are now offering a modern twist on a cherished tradition or making waves for meaningful missions.

Ahead, discover the emerging Latino-powered brands you’ll want to know about, during Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15-October 15) and beyond.

Don’t Be Ableist Y’all Awareness Eco-Friendly Tote Bag, $21

Ability Adaptive Clothing

Austin

Founded by Marta Elena Cortez-Neavel in 2015, Abilitee puts a sleeker spin on adaptive activewear (like colostomy and ileostomy bag covers or insulin pump belts), earning it national recognition for having started the much-needed conversation on the visibility of disability in fashion.

abilitee.com

Texas Love Reversible Bubble by Classic Childhood, $45
Texas Love Reversible Bubble by Classic Childhood, $45

classic childhood

Austin

Pamela Torres’ brand of toddler clothing is as stylish as it is durable (the garments are handmade in the USA from buttons salvaged from landfills). Even better, almost all classic and neutral outfits are reversible.

classicchildhood.com

latin brands
CocoAndre in the Bishop Arts District of Dallas

CocoAndré

dallas

We wanted to keep this list hyper-focused on retail (if we were to tackle the best Latina-owned restaurants, this article would never end), but Andrea Pedraza’s Oak Cliff boutique, with its artful confections and its community focus, deserves the lifestyle spotlight. .

cocoandre.com

Casa Frida
Casa Frida in San Antonio

Casa Frida

San Antonio

Ruby Hernandez’s vibrant vintage airflow is full of one-of-a-kind artisan products, carefully selected from across Mexico. Even Bad Bunny took notice.

la-casa-frida.myshopify.com

latin brands
Custom Flower Crowns Los Ofrendas (image by M Navarro Photography)

Las Ofrendas

Austin

When you’re looking to make (and wear) a statement, TK Tunchez’s cheerful little boutique has just the custom sticker, pendant, earrings or flower crown your bold heart desires.

@lasofrendas

Santamaria Bluebonnet Lily Earrings, $40
Santamaria Bluebonnet Lily Earrings, $40

Santamaria lily

Austin

The eponymous brand of a contemporary Texas artist (whose work is currently on display at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport) offers wearable versions of Santamaria’s incredible beadwork.

lyssantamaria.com

latin brands
Madre Hija Zodiac Collection Cancer, $125

Mother Hija

Austin

Another contemporary Texan artist lending her talent and meticulous eye to jewelry, Caro Toro’s elegant pieces are assembled with precious and recycled vintage beads.

madrehijadesign.com

Marie-Victoria |  Women's Multicolor Patterned Tote Bag, $60
Marie-Victoria | Women’s Multicolor Patterned Tote Bag, $60

Marie-Victoria

Austin

Run by friends Carolina Sandoval and Paulina Nava, Maria Victoria offers a variety of products handmade by Mexican artisans. Although they are perhaps best known for their hand-woven bags, including backpacks, shoulder bags and stunning totes, often made with recycled plastic.

mamariavictoria.com

Hello Moon Apothecary Moon Milk Bath Herbal Tea, $5
Hello Moon Apothecary Moon Milk Bath Herbal Tea, $5

hello moon

dallas

Located inside Uptown’s spacious Movement Loft wellness studio, Hello Moon is packed with handcrafted (or carefully sourced) self-care essentials, from healing crystal sets to shimmering bath bombs.

hellomoonapothecary.com

Cielo Mexicano Flores Blouse by Mi Golondrina, $195
Cielo Mexicano Flores Blouse by Mi Golondrina, $195

Mi Golondrina

dallas

Inspired by her mother’s heritage, Cristina Lynch founded Mi Golondrina in 2013 to bring her modern twist to traditional hand-embroidered clothing. Each dress or blouse, hand-embroidered by Mexican artisans, doubles as wearable art.

migolondrina.com

latin brands
Mija Cultura for the Cultura t-shirt, $40

Culture Mija

Houston

This brilliantly irreverent streetwear label from Houston knows how to have fun with cultural touchstones. Example: literally everything on Joann Alvarez and Karla Dominguez’s site.

mijacultura.com

Rancho Diaz
Ranch Diaz in the historic Pearl District of San Antonio.

Rancho Diaz

San Antonio

Located in San Antonio’s historic Pearl Brewery, this charming boutique offers an eclectic and well-edited mix of handcrafted gifts, textiles, ceramics and more.

ranchodiaz.com

Founder Sonia Rife of Revival Vintage in Austin, Texas

vintage revival

Austin

A premier vintage store in Austin, Revival is known for its timeless mid-century pieces that put the store on the map nearly 10 years ago. Today, Sonia Rife has expanded the Revival brand to include vintage clothing and accessories for men and women, regularly showcasing her wide selection – and other local vintage retailers – at her Sunday Revival markets.

revivalvintageatx.com

Pink Power Latina Tee, $34

JZD shop

Brownsville

Since launching the brand’s Pink Latina Power Tee on Etsy in 2014, Jen Zeano’s empowering merch has found refuge in stylish boutiques across the country (including the aforementioned CocoAndre).

shopjzd.com

latin brands
Don’t Be Ableist Y’all Awareness Eco-Friendly Tote Bag, $21

Ability Adaptive Clothing

Austin

Founded by Marta Elena Cortez-Neavel in 2015, Abilitee puts a sleeker spin on adaptive activewear (like colostomy and ileostomy bag covers or insulin pump belts), earning it national recognition for having started the much-needed conversation on the visibility of disability in fashion.

abilitee.com

Texas Love Reversible Bubble by Classic Childhood, $45
Texas Love Reversible Bubble by Classic Childhood, $45

classic childhood

Austin

Pamela Torres’ brand of toddler clothing is as stylish as it is durable (the garments are handmade in the USA from buttons salvaged from landfills). Even better, almost all classic and neutral outfits are reversible.

classicchildhood.com

latin brands
CocoAndre in the Bishop Arts District of Dallas

CocoAndré

dallas

We wanted to keep this list hyper-focused on retail (if we were to tackle the best Latina-owned restaurants, this article would never end), but Andrea Pedraza’s Oak Cliff boutique, with its artful confections and its community focus, deserves the lifestyle spotlight. .

cocoandre.com

Casa Frida
Casa Frida in San Antonio

Casa Frida

San Antonio

Ruby Hernandez’s vibrant vintage airflow is full of one-of-a-kind artisan products, carefully selected from across Mexico. Even Bad Bunny took notice.

la-casa-frida.myshopify.com

latin brands
Custom Flower Crowns Los Ofrendas (image by M Navarro Photography)

Las Ofrendas

Austin

When you’re looking to make (and wear) a statement, TK Tunchez’s cheerful little boutique has just the custom sticker, pendant, earrings or flower crown your bold heart desires.

@lasofrendas

Santamaria Bluebonnet Lily Earrings, $40
Santamaria Bluebonnet Lily Earrings, $40

Santamaria lily

Austin

The eponymous brand of a contemporary Texas artist (whose work is currently on display at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport) offers wearable versions of Santamaria’s incredible beadwork.

lyssantamaria.com

latin brands
Madre Hija Zodiac Collection Cancer, $125

Mother Hija

Austin

Another contemporary Texan artist lending her talent and meticulous eye to jewelry, Caro Toro’s elegant pieces are assembled with precious and recycled vintage beads.

madrehijadesign.com

Marie-Victoria |  Women's Multicolor Patterned Tote Bag, $60
Marie-Victoria | Women’s Multicolor Patterned Tote Bag, $60

Marie-Victoria

Austin

Run by friends Carolina Sandoval and Paulina Nava, Maria Victoria offers a variety of products handmade by Mexican artisans. Although they are perhaps best known for their hand-woven bags, including backpacks, shoulder bags and stunning totes, often made with recycled plastic.

mamariavictoria.com

Hello Moon Apothecary Moon Milk Bath Herbal Tea, $5
Hello Moon Apothecary Moon Milk Bath Herbal Tea, $5

hello moon

dallas

Located inside Uptown’s spacious Movement Loft wellness studio, Hello Moon is packed with handcrafted (or carefully sourced) self-care essentials, from healing crystal sets to shimmering bath bombs.

hellomoonapothecary.com

Cielo Mexicano Flores Blouse by Mi Golondrina, $195
Cielo Mexicano Flores Blouse by Mi Golondrina, $195

Mi Golondrina

dallas

Inspired by her mother’s heritage, Cristina Lynch founded Mi Golondrina in 2013 to bring her modern twist to traditional hand-embroidered clothing. Each dress or blouse, hand-embroidered by Mexican artisans, doubles as wearable art.

migolondrina.com

latin brands
Mija Cultura for the Cultura t-shirt, $40

Culture Mija

Houston

This brilliantly irreverent streetwear label from Houston knows how to have fun with cultural touchstones. Example: literally everything on Joann Alvarez and Karla Dominguez’s site.

mijacultura.com

Rancho Diaz
Ranch Diaz in the historic Pearl District of San Antonio.

Rancho Diaz

San Antonio

Located in San Antonio’s historic Pearl Brewery, this charming boutique offers an eclectic and well-edited mix of handcrafted gifts, textiles, ceramics and more.

ranchodiaz.com

Founder Sonia Rife of Revival Vintage in Austin, Texas

vintage revival

Austin

A premier vintage store in Austin, Revival is known for its timeless mid-century pieces that put the store on the map nearly 10 years ago. Today, Sonia Rife has expanded the Revival brand to include vintage clothing and accessories for men and women, regularly showcasing her wide selection – and other local vintage retailers – at her Sunday Revival markets.

revivalvintageatx.com

Pink Power Latina Tee, $34

JZD shop

Brownsville

Since launching the brand’s Pink Latina Power Tee on Etsy in 2014, Jen Zeano’s empowering merch has found refuge in stylish boutiques across the country (including the aforementioned CocoAndre).

shopjzd.com

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Zlatan Ibrahimović and Dsquared2 celebrate the fashion capsule collection – WWD https://mijasguide.com/zlatan-ibrahimovic-and-dsquared2-celebrate-the-fashion-capsule-collection-wwd/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 19:05:19 +0000 https://mijasguide.com/zlatan-ibrahimovic-and-dsquared2-celebrate-the-fashion-capsule-collection-wwd/

MILAN — “An ideal ambassador? Nobody. If you already have Ibra, you don’t need anyone else.

True to his reputation and famous self-confidence, AC Milan football star Zlatan Ibrahimović has rejected any suggestion of a possible ambassador to embody the capsule collection he developed with Dsquared2 beyond himself.

Teased in January, the “Black on Black” range was celebrated with an in-store event on Tuesday, which inevitably drew crowds of football supporters and “Ibra” fans (the two don’t necessarily coincide since its fame transcends the sport itself) outside of the brand’s flagship here.

The collection the two parties have designed for Fall 2022, which officially launched this week, is the second tie-up between fashion brand founders Dean and Dan Caten and the athlete, following the year’s flagship project latest Icon Ibrahimović x Dsquared2. But the relationship was forged long before that.

“I met Dean and Dan when I arrived in Italy, back then to play for Juventus Turin,” Ibrahimović said of his first two-year stint in Italian football league Seria A in 2004. .

“My agent Mino [Raiola] did the introductions and suggested they design the team’s uniform, so it all started from there,” the striker continued, recalling how the Canadian duo created the club’s off-pitch kit in 2006.

It took more than a decade to take the tie to the next level, with Ibrahimović stating that “I first had to level up and prove myself” before developing a collection that could be dubbed “Icon”, like the first was.

“I was very proud, first because it wasn’t my world, it was Dean and Dan’s and I was in good hands. And then I was happy because [the collection] actually well done,” the striker said.

For the second effort, the parties offered a full range including daywear, activewear, evening wear and accessories, all rendered in black.

A look from the “Black on Black” capsule collection.

“Black is easy. It’s a must-have,” Dean Caten said, explaining the style choice. “When in doubt, always go black.”

In the case of a football star with 55.3 million Instagram followers, a shimmering touch is also welcome. Cue the rhinestone-studded denim pants that Ibrahimović pulled from the “Black on Black” collection and wore to the event, paired with a black blazer and shiny, point-toe shoes.

Dean and Dan Caten with Zlatan Ibrahimović in Milan.

Courtesy of Dsquared2

“I like fashion but I’m not an expert, my wife Helena [Seger] is,” the player said, pointing to his partner, who was also sporting the brand’s all-black look. “In the beginning, my style was very sporty, I wore a lot of hoodies. Then when I met her, she said, ‘We need to change your wardrobe a bit,’ so I sent her shopping [clothes] for me,” he laughs.

Still, the player still favors staples off the football pitch, such as Dsquared2 t-shirts and jeans, “which fit me really well”, he said. “I like clothes when they are comfortable. When they put me at ease, they work. And that’s what happened first with “Icon” and now with “Black on Black”. I really feel myself wearing them,” Ibrahimović said.

For the Catens, the capsule collection intends to appeal to a different clientele, “sporty, mature, who want to be fashionable but not too much”, specifies Dean Caten.

Ibrahimović has previously teased one of the head-to-toe black looks as he attended the Dsquared2 Fall 2022 menswear show in Milan, which marked a first for him and a “beautiful and intense” experience, as he defined.

When asked if he ever saw himself in fashion, the player’s optimistic attitude gave way to a more cautious approach. “I’m interested in fashion, even if it’s still very new. When you work with experts, you can only learn and grow. So I always stick to football but I approach this world with curiosity. I’m also in fashion city, so it’s a good start for sure,” Ibrahimović said.

While the designers and the football star have remained silent on a possible third chapter of the collaboration, the “Black on Black” range arrives this week on the shelves of Dsquared2 stores and e-commerce, as well as at selected retailers. of the whole world.

A look from the “Black on Black” capsule collection.

Given the uniformity of colors, the collection plays with textures – from leather to satin – and details, including printed logos of the brand name, the footballer’s nickname “Ibra” or embroideries with his initials. Custom denim labels and hang tags also appear on products.

Style-wise, everyday options include a double-breasted felted wool coat, biker pants and wool knitwear, as well as bomber jackets with the football star’s nickname printed on the reverse and denim jackets faded. Fleece hoodies and joggers are the sportiest part of the collection, which also includes beachwear like swimwear, bathrobe and sandals.

Evening wear ranges from classic black tuxedos to sporty outfits, like hoodies and shorts, covered in black crystals for a shimmering touch of “Ibra” eccentricity.

A look from the “Black on Black” capsule collection.

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Fashion resurgence drives growth of SM Store https://mijasguide.com/fashion-resurgence-drives-growth-of-sm-store/ Tue, 13 Sep 2022 07:02:00 +0000 https://mijasguide.com/fashion-resurgence-drives-growth-of-sm-store/

PASAY, Philippines, September 13, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — The SM Store has seen a resurgence in its fashion department, spurred by the return of crowds to stores and malls with the lifting of community restrictions.

Dhinno S. Tiu, SM Store’s Executive Vice President for Sales Operations and Support, said SM Store’s fashion categories which include apparel, footwear, Bagsaccessories and beauty, ended the second quarter on a high note, reaching 95% of pre-pandemic sales.

“Fashion’s resurgence has been spurred by more aggressive spending as the economy reopens. To meet this dynamic demand, we are focused on delivering relevant, up-to-date products and constantly innovating to meet ever-changing needs. Filipino buyers,” says Mr. Tiu.

Trends that emerged over the years under a pandemic leaned toward comfortable loungewear paired with active wardrobe choices when people chose to cycle to work during shutdowns. Kids are also due for a much-needed wardrobe change after a two-year growth spurt. And with the resumption of face-to-face classes, there has also been an increase in demand for school essentials such as shirts, uniforms, shoes, bags and stationery supplies.

With the younger generation in mind, The SM Store developed a ‘Tee Bar,‘ this presents a selection of t-shirts with whimsical and creative designs. The demographic known for their quick and expert understanding of technology can also indulge in the assortment of gadget categories, from headphones to gaming keyboards, that are sure to help a distance learning course or upgraded gear for his next gaming session.

Welcoming the changing trends amid the resurgence in shopping, SM Retail recorded an 18% increase in revenue to PHP 163.7 billion in the first half of 2022. SM Retail’s net profit also increased by 91% to reach PHP7.0 billion through optimized cost savings across all retail formats.

Considering its impact on the environment, SM Retail launched the SM Green Finds initiative. As part of the company’s advocacy for responsibly produced products, the program aims to provide sustainable options to consumers while showcasing local artisans and producers. These products are marked with a Green Finds badge at your favorite SM store.

SM continues to adapt and evolve to provide customers with the most comprehensive, diverse and beneficial offerings to serve them where and how they want to shop.

SOURCE SM Investment Company

]]> Attentive and demanding, this Chennai store wants to make slow-shopping fashionable https://mijasguide.com/attentive-and-demanding-this-chennai-store-wants-to-make-slow-shopping-fashionable/ Sun, 11 Sep 2022 08:36:43 +0000 https://mijasguide.com/attentive-and-demanding-this-chennai-store-wants-to-make-slow-shopping-fashionable/

A click here, a swipe there, or a quick hop to the mall to buy something before a special occasion and go with it – the current scourge of the cash-rich, time-strapped urban Indian is “shopping”. fast” and fashion based in Chennai. Retailer Lata Madhu seems invested in changing that.

“We finished with speed. Good shopping takes dedication, not overspending. One must first understand exactly what one should choose and how the purchase will add value to one’s wardrobe or to one’s life. Shopping well is in itself an art. You have to enjoy the shopping experience, especially when you spend a lot of money on something,” Lata Madhu, founder of Collage told Business Today.

Madhu recently closed a fully operational store to move into a 4,000 square foot heritage property to create a shopping experience that borders on vintage. The aesthetics of the interiors and the comfort offered by the salons of the boutique redefine shopping. Madhu spent seven months simply transforming the space into a studio for designers to display their clothes.

handcrafted jewelry on display

“Designer garments should be honored with great presentation simply for the craftsmanship and skill that goes into making them. Likewise, those who want to acquire these pieces should have the time and space to make wise choices. that it can be easy to strategize and model your business for fast turnover, I decided to shift my work towards rich experience. Slow is good,” Madhu said.

Branches of frangipani and mango trees line the large windows of the two-story building with open rooms, hallways, and balconies. The open verandas have been covered with glass. The halls are lined with clothes racks and lampposts wedged to illuminate the display. Corner lounges have been created for customers to sit and explore the clothes or jewelry they wish to choose.

Madhu calls her collection “everyday luxury”. There are dresses, skirts, dresses, sarees, tunics and more. “The clothes I also show are meant for sustained use, something people can wear over and over again. They are expensive but add value to a wardrobe. It is entirely possible to incorporate high-quality clothing into everyday life. This is where mindful shopping comes in,” she said.

Collage is home to over 40 leading designer clothing brands and selected costume jewelry. There are shopping assistants to advise and help choose a set and create a look for customers. There is even a relaxation area on the ground floor for drivers. Designer brands on display are – Kiran Uttam Ghosh, Payal Khandwala, Itrh, Lajjoo C, Rajdeep Ranawat, Lovebirds, 431-88 Shweta Kapur, Aseem Kapoor, Sukhet Dhir, Amrich, Jayanti Reddy, Pooja Keyur, Raji Ramniq, Madsam Tinzin, Pero and more.

“We are in no rush and we want our customers to have time to make conscious purchases. I even stop people from picking up clothes without thinking. Shop wisely and be happy with what you take home. It’s time to slow down a bit and raise the bar for a quality experience,” she said.

The property, an old two-storey house in Nungambakkam, has been rented out. “During the pandemic, many owners of large homes moved into apartments and either sold their old homes or rented them out due to high maintenance. It was exactly what I was looking for. I decided to close my jazzy store and tone down the shopping experience at Collage,” said Madhu (52). She has been an entrepreneur for more than two decades. “Nothing in the old house was destroyed or altered when she converted it into a store, even the old light switches were kept to give the antique charm,” she said.

Doesn’t it want to match the quick-sales pitch of high street stores? “Not at all. We’re in no rush. Come to our place, when you have time.

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Sandra Gidley apologizes to Romsey Cavendish clothing store for ‘shocking’ Facebook comments https://mijasguide.com/sandra-gidley-apologizes-to-romsey-cavendish-clothing-store-for-shocking-facebook-comments/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://mijasguide.com/sandra-gidley-apologizes-to-romsey-cavendish-clothing-store-for-shocking-facebook-comments/ A Test Valley Borough councilor has apologized for an online comment that left the owner of a new clothing store “feeling flat”.

Sandra Gidley, who represents the Romsey Abbey Division, sparked an outpouring of responses after she criticized Cavendish at Bell Street – a business in her own neighborhood – just days after her womenswear store opened last Thursday.

Responding to a Facebook post about the store’s launch, the former MP said: ‘Hmm. I wouldn’t be dating a Sunday and my wayward husband bought some goods that didn’t last well!’

Dozens of residents and loyal customers have come to the defense of Nick Michell – the owner and founder of both stores – leaving rave reviews. However, he said the reviews still leave a sour taste.

“I went to work on Monday feeling really depressed and, to be honest, I had to go home,” he said. “My reputation is everything to me, and seeing it threatened by an adviser of all really hurts me.

“She should be there to embrace local and independent businesses, not hurt them. I’ve had a lot of people come into the store to tell me not to feel bad about it. left flat at what should be an exciting time.”

Councilor Nick Adams-King was among those who hit back at Cllr Gidley for his remark. He wrote: “Sometimes as a politician the wisest thing is to say nothing at all. I think that would have been the best choice in this case.

READ MORE: Winchester Vodka nightclub asks to extend opening hours to become newest club in town

“It is absolutely shocking that the Downtown Borough Councilor is choosing to publicly dismiss an independent business that is not only successful, but growing.

“Our independent retailers face an extremely difficult environment, the last thing they need is for their local representative to be not only unsupportive but downright disagreeable.”

Cllr Gidley has since responded to the backlash. She said: “I made a consumer comment which, in retrospect, I probably should have kept to myself. I hope all businesses in Romsey do well – we have a very thriving town which is great to see.

“A lot of people responded and said, ‘I actually think it’s an awesome store and I’ve had a lot of really good things from them.’

“I’m sorry, I put it there. I think people should apologize when they’ve said something they regret.

“The comment is there for everyone to see, I’m not going to go back because it was literally a conversation I had with my husband. But I like to think I’m a very fair person of mind, and he actually got a fair amount of publicity from that.

“Having 100 people say ‘you’re awesome’ is much more powerful for the business than one person saying ‘actually, I’m not so sure’.

“I would certainly like, if I’m welcome, to give the business a second chance because I think that would be the only right thing to do.”

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